What Is Platform As A Service (PaaS)?

What Is Platform As A Service (PaaS)?

Platform as a service (PaaS) is one of the most popular types of cloud computing services. When an individual or a company purchases PaaS, they are essentially purchasing a custom-built cloud environment that is developed to support application development, scaling, and operations. Developers can essentially construct applications and test them intensively before deployment. Any PaaS solution needs to be integrated seamlessly with the underlying IaaS environment so that web developers have regular access to the type of hardware resources they need. The developer normally has complete control over how applications are deployed and can even configure the settings of the cloud environment. It is generally seperated from the basic computing infrastructure, the operation and management of which is normally left to the service provider. PaaS is an excellent way of developing comprehensive applications on the cheap without needing to invest in a substantial amount of underlying infrastructure. How much responsibility do you have in a PaaS environment? In a PaaS environment, the developers essentially can focus their entire energy and resources on the rapid development, deployment, and scalability of applications. PaaS works on top of IaaS and it removes the mundane operations of manually running and managing clungy physical servers. In essence, developers can focus on all the back-end stuff that goes on behind the function of a website or an application without worrying about infrastructure. PaaS can be public, private and hybrid It basically boils down to what you want. Amazon, Micrsoft, and the rest have dozens of PaaS services, many of which are perfect for either the public cloud, the private cloud, or a combination of the...
Application Certification for PaaS

Application Certification for PaaS

Cloud foundry announced its new position today as the industry standard in cloud computing services.  Several major software providers like IBM and Hewlett Packard have come together to declare Cloud Foundry as a reliable open source standard for application development.  This is good news for developers that design with cross platform capability in mind and for businesses that need to integrate services provided different vendors. Open source certification also protects developers from having to integrate code for proprietary software that a given platform was designed for so it serves as a clean slate for application developers and platform developers like IBM which used Cloud Foundry to build its own platform Bluemix which is also open source. The best part about open source software are the benefits of its use by private organizations.  Bluemix is free and incorporates open services for promotion of your product and your services. The vendors who have become certified (Century Link, Hewlett Packard Enterprises, Huawei, IBM, Pivotal, SAP HANA, and Swisscom) dominate the market and independent developers who are looking for a competitive edge can become certified as well although it is costly, so costly that I will let you see the price on your own here although you can save an arm and a leg (60%) by becoming a member.  If you dare to look at the price, remember that you are joining the likes of IBM and Hewlet-Packard and if you don’t take pride in the fact that your applications are running on a trusted and secure base. Open source services are always a solid base for developers thanks to the wide collaboration...
Greener Hosting With iNode

Greener Hosting With iNode

In the world of hosting, “Green Hosting” seems to have a variety of definitions that sometimes include using renewable energy sources but in general means being more environmentally friendly. iNode Cloud servers are hosted at the Equinix datacenter in Sydney which has been designed by green in mind. Here are three reasons iNode Cloud hosting equates to Greener Hosting: 1. Less physical space = smaller data centers = less industrial building. Because of the higher densities of cloud server models, the overall data center structure can be smaller, requiring less land space taken up and less building materials to be used in construction. 2. Fewer physical servers. Allocating a physical server for every project need obviously requires quite a few resources to be consumed during the manufacturing process of the hardware. Some of these materials are recyclable, but not all, and even then just because something is recyclable doesn’t mean it’s ideal to consume those resources in the first place. iNode Cloud servers greatly reduces the need for hardware production, as multiple projects can exist on a single cloud server. 3. Lower power use. Data centers use a lot of power. I’ve read criticism of data centers by environmentalists – and that’s justified to an extent – especially with older data centers that haven’t been updated and are less efficient. iNode Cloud servers consume only a small portion of the power that a physical dedicated hosting server requires. Utilization of our cloud server hosting is a much more efficient model for power consumption, whether utility provided or renewable. More information can be found at the Equinix Website If you want a greener...
Australian accountants head for the Cloud

Australian accountants head for the Cloud

Just as other countries have embraced the cloud for computer storage, Australia has shifted over to use the modern storage concept. In fact, as many as 69% of accountants in Australia have now started using cloud software, and the probability of that figure growing is high. Not surprisingly, perhaps, the younger accountants in the survey were more likely to embrace the cloud, while their older counterparts were a shade more reluctant. A recent survey of small and medium sized accounting firms showed that they really love and embrace using SaaS programs (software as a service).  Overall, as many as 27% of small and medium companies use cloud-based accounting programs and storage.  However, 60% haven’t even tried it yet, so the future for expansion is bright.  Even for those who didn’t use SaaS apps, they still liked the idea of the cloud, and are finding it to be revolutionary to the industry. There are two main programs that Australian accountants love – Xero and MYOB.  Accounting companies use 1.9 cloud-based apps on average, but 59% use two or more apps, so clearly this is a popular technology among those who have embraced it. Topping it all off, 96% of those surveyed who currently use the cloud plan to expand their use of it.  It helps make reporting much easier to store and share, leading to the increased use, as well as being able to access the SaaS software, saving money in the process.  Instead of each company having to purchase a full software suite, they can access what they need, usually for a small fee, on the Internet. Those who...
Why choose an Australian web hosting company?

Why choose an Australian web hosting company?

If you run an Australian based company and the majority of your clients are from Australia there are some very good reasons to choose an Australian Web Hosting company. Speed – Even though broadband has made huge progress these last few years, hosting overseas means that extra 3,000 kilometres of cable adds at least an additional 1/2 a second on your download time. One of the largest web design blogs in the world, Noupe, takes a full 2 seconds to fully view their page in its entirety. And if one of the largest web design companies can’t compete on speed how on Earth are you going to? SEO Factor – Hosting your website overseas means that you will probably have a shared IP address in the US. This often means that Google will bundle you together as a US based business. This is especially the case if you have a www.yourdomain.com address. If you want targeted searches from Australians you really need an IP address from Australia. Support – Being in the same time zone as your webhost means that when most issues arise, they arise during business hours and can be sorted out before close of business Australian time. If your website goes down at 2pm and its midnight where your webhost is, don’t expect a response until 9pm. Fluctuating Currency – Buying from an Australian Web Host means that your monthly bill does not fluctuate with the irregularities of the short term money market. The Aussie Dollar might be at parity at the moment but 3 years ago it was 60 cents in the dollar. Can your web budget handle a blow out like that?...
Bash Critical Security Hole – Explained

Bash Critical Security Hole – Explained

Yesterday we swiftly patched all of our customers web servers due to a critical vulnerability to Bash, aka the Bourne-Again Shell. but what damage could this vulnerability do? The flaw involves how Bash evaluates environment variables. With specifically crafted variables, a hacker could use this hole to execute shell commands. This, in turn, could render a server vulnerable to ever greater assaults. By itself, this is one of those security holes where an attacker would already need to have a high level of system access to cause damage. Unfortunately, as Red Hat’s security team put it, “Certain services and applications allow remote unauthenticated attackers to provide environment variables, allowing them to exploit this issue.” The root of the problem is that Bash is frequently used as the system shell. Thus, if an application calls a Bash shell command via web HTTP or a Common-Gateway Interface (CGI) in a way that allows a user to insert data, the web server could be hacked. As Andy Ellis, the Chief Security Officer of Akamai Technologies, wrote: “This vulnerability may affect many applications that evaluate user input, and call other applications via a shell.” That could be a lot of web applications — including many of yours. The consequences of an attacker successfully exploiting this vulnerability on a Web server are serious in nature. For example attackers may have the ability to dump password files or download malware on to infected computers. Once inside the victim’s firewall, the attackers could then compromise and infect other computers on the network. Aside from Web servers, other vulnerable devices include Linux-based routers that have a Web interface...
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